In five, four, three….

146So we’re in the home stretch. Review is in two and a half weeks and everything is coming together. This past week I worked on the backrest, which I neglected until the very end mostly because I wasn’t sure how to do it. The beginning of the process was easy enough–mark on the frame pieces and then also on the backrest itself where to cut the mortises and go ahead and cut them.
147

 

 

 

 

 

I did this while the backrest was still oversized and had two flat ends so I wouldn’t have to worry about shimming up a curved piece on the moritser. I just cut the mortises deeper than I would have otherwise, knowing I would be cutting off some length afterwards. 

148149

150
153

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once this was done, I had to figure out how to actually cut the backrest down to size. This was complicated by the fact that when the frame was clamped up with the seat, the space for the backrest wasn’t exactly square and the fact that the frames are at an angle to one another, making it also not square in the other dimension. One dimension not being square is much easier to deal with than two. I planned to make a mock up and then just trace its size on to the actual backrest, but I cut the angle wrong and cut the whole thing too small almost immediately. Then, I made another one and made the same mistakes again. At this point I was out of mock-up material so I just bit the bullet and started on the real thing, thinking, “fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me three times, shame on me.”

151152

 

 

 

 

 

I measured the width between the two top back corners and transferred that measurement to the backrest, then did the same for the bottom back corners, then the two distances in the front. I cut the backrest down to size on the front end (also the widest end) and set to taking off little by little by little on the back end where it tapers by setting the belt sander at an angle and touching the wood to it ever so slightly over and over.155
154 

 

 

 

 

This involved a lot of walking back and forth between the sander and the clamped-up chair, taking a little off, checking, taking a little more off, checking, etc. until it finally fit. Also, my efforts to document this process were photo-bombed by Andrew and Morgan, two of my shop-mates and students in Mark’s wood design class. Morgan is making a credenza and Andrew is making a cradle, like for a baby. They are both talented and lovely people. It occurred to me as they jumped into the photos that it probably seems like I’m alone in the shop most of the time and that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Not only are Mark’s students down there working on their own furniture projects, but the rest of the school uses the shop for site model building and numerous other projects related to their studio designs. It is usually loud and bustling. If you look at the “people engaged/conversations had” page on this blog, it should be clear how much interaction and network building it actually takes to make something.157156
158
159

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next I did a ton of sanding. Once the chair is glued up, many places will be more difficult to reach and sand properly, so I used the orbital sander and passed over everything with 80 and 120 grits. I will go back after the glue up and sand everything by hand, probably doing 120 again, then 150 and 180. These would have been boring photos–just me standing with a sander, so I skipped them, but I had a lot of good dance time while I sanded. Then came the moment of truth: THE GLUE UP. I cannot possibly explain the amount of psyching myself up I did or how panicked I felt throughout the whole thing. I thought about having someone take pictures of me while I did it, but then saw myself yelling at a nice young architecture student to stop taking fucking pictures of me so I decided against it. It went pretty well, though I still feel kind of panicked about it even now hours later. So here it is–waiting for the glue to dry and to add all the finishing touches. Yikes!161

162

 

 

 

 

 

p.s. I thought you might be interested to see what everyone else is working on so here are a few other projects currently in process: Katharina is making a credenza out of spalted, local Texas pecan; the circle is one end of the cradle Andrew is making out of mahogany (outrageous skills on this guy), and Tristan is making a bed out of Ash.164 165

 

 

 

 

163

 

D pulled me over and said “hide your gold. The girl is crafty like ice is cold.”

I’m not a thief, just conveniently both a lover of the Beastie Boys and a female craftsman (one of which I’m a veteran at). 38 Here’s what’s been happening on the ranch: I had a little repair work to do after those glue ups didn’t go exactly as planned. There are a few joints that don’t close up totally perfectly all the way through and so I filled those tiny gaps with a mixture of super glue and mahogany sawdust. 39A good woodworker will be able to spot this if she’s looking, but it’s pretty unlikely anyone else will notice this. Mark always says that being able to make repairs is also part of the craft and I’m learning more and more how large a part of the process it is (for me). This is not to say that there isn’t a point at which something should actually be done over again because it’s just not good enough, but that minor imperfections, which will always happen, can be toned down, hidden, or even played up depending on intention of the piece. I am also learning that superglue and sawdust look really gross when they dry on your finger.

After this, I moved on to the rockers, something I felt a little more confident about having done a couple successful mock ups a few weeks back. I cut 1/4″ strips on the table saw, kept them in the same order, spread glue in between each layer, and then bent them over this heavy-duty foam form. I started with the middle clamps and then worked my way out. I repeated with the second rocker.

40 41 42

43

 

 

 

 

 

And I’m now back in unfamiliar territory. I began the process of trimming down the legs, being careful to leave them long so I can still adjust as necessary as I start to assemble all the separate pieces together. There are two pieces on the back frame and two pieces on the front frame, and the pairs didn’t line up exactly once they went through the band saw separately, so I then took them to the belt sander, clamped together, to make sure the separate pieces in each pair are the same size and shape. In doing these steps, I trimmed down the extra material on the tenons I glued in last week, and most of the joints are looking better than I had feared.

44 45 46It’s now actually possible –if I stand way back–to see the whole piece taking shape in elevation.  48